13th EOU Congress 2022

Giessen, Germany
March, 14 - 18, 2022

Plenary Speakers

photo: Daniel Jakli

Veronika Bókony

Veronika Bókony

Plant Protection Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Budapest, Hungary

I am an evolutionary ecologist and my main research question is how animals are affected by, and adapt to, anthropogenic environmental changes. I have been studying the effects of habitat urbanization on small passerine birds’ behavior, physiology, and breeding success, and the consequences of climate change for avian migration and reproduction. In recent years I broadened the scope of my research to investigate similar questions in other taxa, and to study how human-induced habitat changes such as chemical pollution and climate change may influence sex development and sex ratios in wildlife populations.

Nikita Chernetsov

Nikita Chernetsov

Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia

I am interested in avian migration with a particular focus on orientation and navigation mechanisms the birds use to reach the goal(s) of their movements. I am mainly doing behavioural experiments on migrating birds, but I am also collaborating a lot with biophysicists, sensory physiologists and neurobiologists in order to obtain a mechanistic understanding of avian orientation and navigation.

Lukas Jenni

Lukas Jenni

Swiss Ornithological Institute, Sempach, Switzerland

My research focussed on bird migration and its ecophysiology, the ecophysiology of stress, and the moult of birds. I was also involved in many other projects at the Swiss Ornithological Institute and supervised studies in avian ecology and conservation. Since retirement, I am interested in follow-up studies on bird migration, feather structure and growth, and how birds react to human stressors.

Anna Qvarnström

Anna Qvarnström

Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden

My team uses a young secondary contact zone between pied and collared flycatchers on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, Sweden as a “natural laboratory” to study speciation. In particular, we are interested in how population divergence in ecological adaptations, such as climate adaptation, relates to the build-up of different sources of reproductive isolation. We also study environmental factors (e.g., habitat heterogeneity) and evolutionary processes (e.g., character displacement) that mitigate ecological competition and reproductive interference between young species once they are formed.

Claire Spottiswoode

Claire Spottiswoode

FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, University of Cape Town

Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge

I am fascinated by species interactions such as parasitism and mutualism. My two main areas of research are coevolution between between brood-parasitic birds (particularly cuckoo finches and honeyguides) and their hosts, in Zambia; and mutualism between honeyguides and the human honey-hunters with whom they cooperate to gain access to bees’ nests, in Mozambique and elsewhere in eastern Africa. Both projects involve close cooperation with rural communities, and rely on their local field knowledge and skill.

Martin Wikelski

Martin Wikelski

Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Radolfzell, and University of Konstanz, Germany

He studies global animal movements. Under his leadership, the space-borne ICARUS project was launched in collaboration with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Russian space organization Roskosmos: The ICARUS antenna, which was mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) in the summer of 2018, makes it possible to track the global migration paths of animals that have been outfitted with transmitters. Martin Wikelski and his team strive to understand and predict which decisions animals will make on their journey, how animals will interact with their ever-changing environment, and the consequences their migrations have on ecosystems and humans. Above all, this insight will enable us to predict the impact that we humans have on these processes and allow us to understand the future consequences.

With thanks to our local partners

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